Mastersthoughts little girl

Ask me anything   Submit   My inner kink the side the world does not get to see... These are all the things I want to do or have done ;) I am owned and happy I love you Mastersthoughts

NSFW 18+ please

ickle-nellie-rose:

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]
petticoatruler:

don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.


Realise (and this goes beyond illness & disability):
- if you have any jokes you share with them about their illness/disability, that you use to help them deal with it, DO NOT automatically assume that those jokes will work the same with other people who have the same illness/disability. I have jokes I share with my sister that I’d never DREAM of saying to anyone else, because I know that those are OUR jokes, so don’t be like those people that say “but I have a black friend who-” NO. No no no. No.

This Is so important, I have a chronic stomach condition that people just don’t understand why I can’t drink all the time.. Or eat spicy food…

ickle-nellie-rose:

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]

petticoatruler:

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

Realise (and this goes beyond illness & disability):

- if you have any jokes you share with them about their illness/disability, that you use to help them deal with it, DO NOT automatically assume that those jokes will work the same with other people who have the same illness/disability. I have jokes I share with my sister that I’d never DREAM of saying to anyone else, because I know that those are OUR jokes, so don’t be like those people that say “but I have a black friend who-” NO. No no no. No.

This Is so important, I have a chronic stomach condition that people just don’t understand why I can’t drink all the time.. Or eat spicy food…

(via subbybaby)

— 9 hours ago with 19895 notes

kiltypleasures:

As it’s Saturday. How about I tie you up and fuck you?

The answer is yes by the way..

(Source: italiansd0itbetter, via catiebriehart)

— 1 month ago with 8850 notes

pullmyponytail:

Pulling hair gets me wet every time. ….

(Source: punk-rock-bondage, via mastersthoughts)

— 2 months ago with 12530 notes